Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: Crochet Ice Pop Cozies (Beginner)

Hey Dearies! So, since we are in summer, I wanted to give you all a pattern that was perfect for this season! As I was growing up, one of the favorite cold treat to have on a hot day, other than ice cream, was freeze pops!

We would always have so many of them that the only ones that were left in the fridge were the colors that we didn’t care to have. My favorites were red, pink, and of course blue!

These cozies are not only super cute, but they are perfect for the little ones and those who don’t like holding cold stuff in their hands. These are just a simple and very basic to make, so if you are short on time, these can be finished within a  few minutes, depending on how fast you crochet.

I have also included two sets of the same pattern, one for switching colors and the other one for making just solid colors. The color switching one will be first and the solid color one will be after that.

Here’s what you will need:

  • Medium Yarn (In any color you would like, or have two colors for more fun!)
  • 4.5 mm hook
  • Stitch Markers (This is optional, but if you are a beginner, I highly recommend to use.)
  • Sewing Needle

Let’s Begin! (Color Switching)

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Chain 13 and slip stitch into the first ch to create a ring.

Round 1: Ch 2. 13 half double crochet in the ring, slip stitch on the top of your ch 2 to close. Work each round continuously; use a stitch marker to help keep track of the rounds.

Round 2: 13 half double crochet around.

Round 3: 13 half double crochet around.

Round 4: 13 half double crochet around. (This is where you can choose to switch colors if you like.)

Round 5: 13 half double crochet around.

Round 6: 13 half double crochet around.

Round 7: 13 half double crochet around. (This is where you would switch your colors again.)

Round 8: 13 half double crochet around.

Round 9: 13 half double crochet around.

Finish off and sew in ends.

 

Let’s Begin! (Solid Color)

20190611_101853.jpg

Chain 13 and slip stitch into the first ch to create a ring.

Round 1: Ch 2. 13 half double crochet in the ring, slip stitch on the top of your ch 2 to close. Work each round continuously; use a stitch marker to help keep track of the rounds.

Round 2-9: 13 half double crochet.

Finish off and sew in ends.

This is something that can be done very quickly and it’s also fun to mix the colors around. These are also perfect for selling at craft fairs since it is something simple to create!

Also, if you don’t like the size of the cozie, you can always add more rows to make it longer.

Another thing, if you wanted it to sit at the end of the freeze pop, you can always sew the bottom of it. However, I like the cozy being the size it is since it’s easier to move and adjust when you are eating the freeze pop.

 

Don’t forget to check out my Facebook page! I try to go live on Tuesdays and if you like my page, I do polls and free giveaways as well! Also, this is usually the first place that I post updates on my blog as well!

https://www.facebook.com/katiesblog96971617/

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: Crochet Adult Size Dragon Ball Z Goku Hat (Easy)

Hey dearies! Today I am back with a NEW pattern that I had to try and recreate. As you all know, some patterns can be available for a limited time or a price. A lot of creators rather create the items instead of having an option to buy the pattern.

Especially, if you know someone or really want something that they have created. Well, that’s what happened to me. As I was scrolling on Pinterest, I happened to see this hat set:2019-05-21.png

As soon as I saw it, I showed it to my fiance, who is a HUGE Dragon Ball Z fan and loved it! So, I looked into seeing if there was a pattern or someone who sells the pattern itself. Sadly, I didn’t get a pattern or couldn’t purchase a pattern.

When you can’t get a pattern, what do you do?

Recreate it, of course! Now, this was a simple recreate because the beanie is simple and those patterns are free, but I put a little twist to mine. I’m going to show you how to make the orange hat, the green one I am still currently looking for another pattern for the antenna’s, but once I do, I’ll have that pattern up for you all!

Let’s talk about what you will need:

  • Medium Size Yarn (In Orange, Black, and White)
    • I used Red Heart Super Saver Pumpkin, since I still have a huge skein of that left and same with the white.
    • I also used I Love This Yarn for the black, since I didn’t have any Red Heart in black.
  • 5.0mm
    • You can change the hook size to a 5.5mm or 6.0mm because the beanie will be really snug when it’s finished.
  • Sewing Needle
  • Scissors

*Note: This size fits an adult. My fiance’s head size is 21 inches, but I did adjust the pattern so that it wasn’t so tight. If anyone wants me to re-adjust the size if you want me to make one for the kiddos or baby sizes!

Let’s Begin!

-Hat-

Starting with the orange yarn, chain 5 and slip stitch in the first stitch chain to form a loop

Row 1: Chain 2. Make 10 double crochets in the loop. Join at the top of the first double crochet with a slip stitch. (10)

Row 2: Chain 2. Make two double crochets in each stitch. Join as you did before in row 1. (20)

Row 3: Chain 2. *Double crochet in the first stitch, Make 2 double crochets in the next stitch* Repeat * around. Join. (30)

Row 4: Chain 2. *Double crochet in the next 2 stitches, 2 double crochets in the next stitch* Repeat *around. Join. (40)

Row 5: Chain 2. *Double crochet in the next 3 stitches, 2 double crochets in the next stitch* Repeat * around. Join. (50)

Row 6: Chain 2. *Double crochet in the next 4 stitches, 2 double crochets in the next stitch* Repeat * around. Join. (60)

Row 7: Chain 2. * Double crochet in the next 5 stitches, 2 double crochets in the next stitch* Repeat * around. Join. (70)

Row 8: Chain 2. *Double crochet in the next 6 stitches, 2 double crochet in the next stitch* Repeat * around. Join. (80)

Row 9-15: Chain 2. Double crochet in each stitch. Join. (80)

Row 16-19: Switch to the black yarn. Chain 2. Double crochet in each stitch. Join. (80)

Row 20: Chain 1. Single crochet in each stitch. Join. Fasten off. (80)

Now that our hat is done, we need to create the circle part.

-Symbol Base (White circle)-

Grab the white yarn, chain 5 and slip stitch into the first chain to create a loop.

Row 1: Chain 2. Make 10 double crochets in the loop. Join. (10)

Row 2: Chain 2. Make 2 double crochets in every stitch. (20)

Row 3: Chain 2. *Double crochet in the first stitch, 2 double crochets in the next stitch* Repeat * around. Join. (20)

Row 4: Chain 2. *Double crochet in the next 2 stitches, 2 double crochets in the next stitch* Repeat * around. Join. (30)

Row 5: Chain 2. *Double crochet in the next 3 stitches, 2 double crochets in the next stitch* Repeat *around. Join. (40)

Row 6: Chain 1. Single crochet in each stitch. Join

Row 7: Change to black yarn. Chain 1. Single crochet in each stitch. Join. Fasten off.

The next part is totally up to you. My fiance didn’t want the symbol that they had, in the original picture, so he wanted me to do this symbol instead:

2019-05-21 (1).png

I’m sorry that I don’t know the symbols, but this is what he chose. You have to do one of two things to get the symbol on the white piece.

  1. Sew on the symbol.
  2. Puffy Paint it on.

I’ve never used puffy paint, but I wanted to give it a try and still give the ‘3D’ effect. I can sew, but let’s be honest, I got very frustrated on trying to do so. The good thing about sewing is that you can pull it from your project.

Here’s how the puffy paint came out:

20190521_164903.jpg

You don’t have to do either of the symbols, get creative and put whatever you would like!

Once you are done with the symbol, make sure that if you used the puffy paint, let it dry for about 4 hours before touching it or doing this next step.

Take your hat and white symbol circle, grab some black yarn and sew on the circle symbol piece to the hat. And you should be all set to wear it!

I’m going to try my best and create the other hat, but make sure you are following my Facebook page! I usually update when I’m about to create a new pattern or if you want to suggest any ideas that you would like me to recreate!

 

Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: Crochet Hooks, What Should I Get? (For Beginners)

Hey Dearies! Since I am working on a few projects, I figured I would talk to you about the many crochet hooks that you can come to choose from. Especially if you are a beginner, knowing what hooks to get can is very important!

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As a beginner myself, I jumped right into buying a set of crochet hooks from Wish and went from there. However, since I got lucky and only paid 3 bucks for a mini set, I wish I would’ve known there was more than just one type of hooks.

Each type of hooks can have a different feel or how they are in general, but before we get into how they feel, let’s talk about the different kinds of hooks you can get:

  • Aluminum Hooks
  • Plastic Hooks
  • Steel Hooks
  • Wooden/Bamboo Hooks
  • Japanese Hooks

I’m going to break each of these down just so you can get a picture of how they are like and if they are for you. The only ones that I don’t have in my possession, are the Japanese Hooks, but I will still explain and have a photo of them just so you know what they look like.

Also, I am going to put a chart of the different sizes of hooks you can get and how they are labeled, as well.

Image result for crochet hooks size chart

As you can see, there are 3 different types of labels for these hooks. USA, English, and Metric. The easiest one to go by is Metric, I found that it was easier to find hook sizes by using their actually metric size.

To me, using letters to determine which size hook, has been confusing and usually if a pattern says a hook size as a letter, I always end up looking up in my crochet books or search in Google, to get the metric size. Hence why my patterns, don’t have the hooks in letter sizes.

If you are a beginner, Metric is the way to go, but you can determine which one you feel most comfortable following. If you are wondering how small these hooks can be, they can get pretty small or really huge.

Now, let’s get down to talking about the actual hooks themselves.


Aluminum Hooks 

WIN_20181220_14_45_00_Pro

There are one of the most common hooks you can get. I prefer them/use them, for almost every project! These hooks were one of the first ones that I bought to get into crocheting. They can come in all different colors and can go as little as 0.60!

However, for the little hook sizes, you have to be VERY careful. I actually have a few of the tiny ones and let me tell you, they can bend very easily. I haven’t even used them once, but they bent trying to get them out of the packaging!

Lucky, I haven’t reached a project where I’m required to use them, yet.

Another thing to look out for is that they can’t get wet! When I mean by that is if you have sweaty palms or hands, they can tend to be more difficult to work. First time I used them, I was so excited and nervous that it made it difficult to want to work with them.

Although, you can get grips or even use tape to place around the handle of the hook, making it easier to grip and easier to handle your work better!

Overall, they are perfect for beginners! Plus, I love the different colors you can get them in. My family usually get me crocheting books, and some of them come with these hooks, so I have already started a collection with my metal hooks!


Plastic Hooks

Image result for crochet plastic hook

These next hooks are another fun-coloring type of crochet hook. Now, I want to let you all know that I haven’t had the pleasure to work with a plastic hook in a ‘normal’ size, meaning the only sizes I have are an 8.0-11.5.

Have I worked with them? Yes, I actually used one of them to make a basket for my mini balls of yarn. I do plan on getting myself a plastic set, just so I can have them for an option, which a lot of crocheters tend to so that.

These hooks work pretty well, I don’t have any complains, although I have seen and heard from a few people, that they are very easy to break, which I figured they would because they are made up of plastic.

However, I haven’t had one break on me, ‘knock on wood’, but I can see the smaller ones breaking a lot quicker than the bigger ones.

Overall, I see more people use the bigger plastic hooks more than I do the smaller ones.


Steel Hooks

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I know you are probably thinking, ‘What’s the difference between these and the aluminum ones?’. Well, there are a few differences, but let me explain why.

These hooks have a built-in handle, which is perfect for if you have sweaty hands, as I do from time to time. Not only that, having a handle makes it easier for you to grip the hook better, but it makes it easier to control smaller hooks.

Yes, they do make them in smaller hooks. I actually bought myself a set, that also came with a storage bag, because I was looking for something to help me better grip my smaller hooks, especially, since I crochet a lot of towel toppers.

Although, these are one of my ‘go to’s’, the only problem I have with them is the grips. Now, the set that I bought, had rubber grips, but they were starting to slide off and it made it bothers me when they do that. Especially, when you are crocheting.

If you do want to get yourself a set of these hooks, go for the ones that are built onto the hook itself. If you do end up getting a rubber set, take some hot glue or craft glue, and glue the inside of the rubber piece, and slide your hook back on.

Overall, they do have some very cute grip holders and they can come in multiple colors. These are definitely a must, especially, if you are a beginner!


Wooden/Bamboo Hooks

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These hooks were the first thing that I really wanted, as soon as I got into crocheting! They were handmade and hand-carved, but I really just wanted them as an option and to grow my hook collection.

They are so smooth to the touch and have a point at the top of the hook, which makes going into stitches easier. The size of every hook is hand carved into the hook itself. These were so pretty I didn’t want to use them, but I did have some problems.

The ones I have, they felt weird to use, but when it comes to trying out different hooks, it can take a while to adjust, but it felt weird to use them. It’s not that I didn’t like them, I just the hook itself is very awkward.

I even put on a handle, which I didn’t want to do, but with the handle, it was a little easier.

The smallest size they go, in carving them with would, is a 3.0. Anything smaller is just a metal hook with a wooden grip, which I would like to note, the wooden grip is very strong and I haven’t had any problems with it.

Overall, I like to have a set, just to have it, but I have used them before. It does take some type to get used to, but you also need to be careful because since these are made up of wood/bamboo, they are very easy to break. Hence why they don’t go smaller with size!


Japanese Hooks

Image result for japanese crochet hooks

Now, as I said in the beginning, I’ve never tried these, so I can’t really give a good detailed explanation whether they are good or bad. I do see quite of bit of other crocheters that do use them.

What I have read, from my crocheting books, these hooks are perfect for people who have small hands and it helps with arthritis. From the looks of these hooks, they do look very comfortable.

Overall, you have to try them to get the feel from them. I do plan on getting a set in the near future.


In order to find out what hook works for you, try them all out! Of course, you don’t have to buy the entire set of them, you can always get just one of each and see how they are for you!

I like to have options, especially when crocheting. Have a set of each different hook can give me more options to choose from, no matter what size hook I need!

Leave a comment down below letting me know what kind of hook you prefer to use! I’d love to know!

Don’t forget to follow my Facebook page, I update my temperature blanket daily on there, go live crocheting, and even have free giveaways! Link is down below!

 

https://www.facebook.com/katiesblog96971617/

Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: Crochet Stuffed Easter Egg (Easy)

Good Morning Dearies! So, I am going to shake it up a bit and we are doing something for Easter! I know it is a little early, but with my crocheted Easter Baskets up for orders, I wanted to show everyone how to make these cute little eggs, just in time for Easter!

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These are great for babies for their first Easter or for toddlers if you want them to find something other than jelly beans and candy! These eggs don’t take long to make, but they add the perfect touch to a crocheted Easter Basket!

So, before I begin, I want to talk to you about this pattern. I’ve made about 3 of these eggs, 4 if you include the tutorial I’ll be doing for you all. I’ve used a different brand type of yarn, just to see if there is a difference, and I believe it was my tension, but I’m still unsure.

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The pattern recommends Red Heart Yarn, so I would just use Red Heart, you can try it with different brands and if you do, and they turn out great, feel free to let me know in the comments!

Anyway, let’s talk about all that you will need:

  • 5.0 mm hook
  • Red Heart Yarn
    • I will be using the color aqua. I’m just guessing because I lost the yarn label for it, but I know it’s Red Heart.
  • Stitch Marker
  • Stuffing of your choice
    • I’m using the stuffing that you get from Walmart in the craft section. Basic stuffing for stuffed animals.
  • Sewing Needle
  • Row Counter (optional)
    • I wrote down the numbers of rows and crossed them off as I go. You don’t need a row counter, but if you are a beginner, I highly recommend that you use one.

Let’s begin!

Round 1: Chain 2. Make 6 single crochets in the second chain from your hook. Don’t connect. (6 stitches)

20190226_100235.jpg

Round 2: Make a single crochet in the next stitch and place a stitch marker(You’ll be moving this stitch marker for every row), then make another single crochet in that same stitch. In the next stitches, make 2 single crochets in each until you reach the stitch marker. (12 stitches)

Round 3: Single crochet in each stitch.

Round 4: Make *2 single crochet in the next stitch, single crochet in the next.* Repeat (18 stitches)

Note: The * are for repeating an amount of different stitches for a round or row.

Round 5: Rep Rnd 3.

Round 6: Work *2 single crochets in the next stitch, single crochet in the next 2 stitches.* Repeat. (24 stitches)

Round 7: Rep Rnd 3.

Round 8: Work *2 single crochets in the next stitch, single crochet in the next 3 stitches.* Repeat. (30 stitches)

Round 9-11: Rep Rnd 3.

Round 12: *Single crochet decrease in the next stitch, single crochet in the next 3 stitches.* Repeat. (24 stitches)

Round 13: Repeat Rnd 3.

Round 14: Single crochet decrease 12 times. (12 stitches)

Round 15: Rep Rnd 3. Stuff the egg. (I used the other side of my crochet hook to help stuff the egg because the hole is really small.)

Round 16: Single crochet decrease 6 times. (6 stitches)

Finish off, leaving a long tail to weave through the remaining 6 stitches. Pull tight and secure the end and make sure to weave it in, as well.

20190226_112520.jpg

There you have it! Perfect pretty Easter eggs for the kiddos!

Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: What Are C2C?

When you first get into crocheting, the first thing you do, before you even get into it, is figuring out what you want to learn how to make. For me, other than my great-grandmother’s crocheted towel toppers, was the C2C. C2C is a ‘corner to corner’ type of stitch that you would find in blankets.

A corner to corner is something that you would usually see for a blanket, but I have seen many for scarfs and rugs as well. They are perfect for testing the limits to see what you can do with your crocheting skills. Here are a few examples that other’s have made:

Image result for c2c crochet

Image result for c2c crochet

You can get really creative with these types of projects! I will say, these are a lot easier to understand than graphgans. If this is something that you have saved in your Pinterest folder, or you are waiting for all your projects are done before starting something new, sit back and relax! I’m going to answer a few questions and give some tips, I have picked up, on C2C!

What will you need?

Depending on the pattern or idea you have in mind, you will need to start out on graph paper. If you are going for the basic C2C, having a graph will help you keep track of where you are, but graphs are used for more characters or lettering. For example, I am going to use this pixel picture:

Related image

Since we are going to be using this heart, as an example, we need to figure out how many bobbins and colors we will need. I also want to note that you can always change the colors for any of these types of projects. It won’t change how you make the C2C, only the colors.

For this project we need 4 different colors:

  • White
  • Black
  • Dark Red
  • Red

Now, let’s talk about bobbins, if you don’t know what they are, here is a picture of what they look like, you will need these, unless, you are using multiple skiens, which I don’t recommend because you have to turn the project back and forth, when you are done with a row.

Image result for crochet bobbins
These ones aren’t exactly for ‘crocheting’, but the reason why I like these, is because you can clip them onto your work as you are working.

From looking back at the graph, I see that we will need about 9 bobbins, but like i said, every project will be different and you will have to determined what you will need for each project.

How do you start one?

After you have figured out what you need, you can then start. A lot of people start by chaining 6, but I prefer chaining 5. The reason for this is because I am one of those picky people that doesn’t like giant gaps or holes in my projects and I like to keep it that way.

Chaining 6, is what people normally do, but it doesn’t change the C2C. The only other difference is that, when you connect the squares together, they won’t be the same. For now, here is the video I followed:

*Note: This is not my video, this is to show what type of C2C I am currently using. All credit goes to Heart Hook Home.*

Is it easy?

Once you get the hang of it, it isn’t that hard to do! The only parts that I struggle with is changing color, but there are so many videos on YouTube that have helped me out with that!

What videos do you recommend?

I can recommend a few, but you’ll have to find someone that you can follow. Everyone is different, especially, when it comes to crocheting. I am also one of those people that likes to get right down to the point, especially, when it comes to tutorials.

Keep in mind, that some people can give you way too much information, to the point where you aren’t sure what you are doing. Heart Hook Home, did an awesome job explaining a C2C, I highly recommend you watching her tutorial.

If you want to learn, almost everything that is to know about a C2C, then the Crochet Crowd is your best option, although, I personally, don’t recommend him to anyone who is a beginner. I honestly found his video, on C2C, very confusing and especially as a beginner.

 

This was just a little more information, not a lot, but enough, to possibly get you going in the right direction of C2C. Once you learn how to do it, you won’t want to stop!

If you haven’t liked my Facebook page, I will be going live, tonight, with a surprise, that I am making for this month of January! Make sure to like my page and check it out!

 

Posted in Arts and Crafts

Basic Stitches & Terms Should Know For Crocheting

I was a beginner to crocheting, in the beginning of the year, but I got hooked into it the moment I first learned how to crochet. I thought it was going to be very difficult to pick up, unlike knitting, which my grandmother taught me to do.

If you are interested in learning how to crochet, please keep reading! There were a lot to learn and a lot of different terms. I do consider myself still a ‘beginner’, but I do know most of the stitches and terms, which I have learned over time.

First thing is first, if you are a true beginner, I suggest getting a set of crochet hooks. The first set I ever bought was on Wish, but if you don’t want to wait weeks on end for stuff, you can find a set on Amazon for about $10-$15. Some sets will even come with markers, tape measures, plastic needles, scissors, and some other stuff as well!

Image result for crochet hooks

If you don’t have the extra money to buy a set, you can always go to your local craft store or Walmart, and get the following:

  • Crochet Hook
    • Start with a 5.0mm hook. Most projects require this size and it is also the size I am going to use to show you each stitch.
  • Yarn Size 4 (Medium)
    • If you are unsure what size the yarn is, you can always check on the back of the yarn label, and it will tell you what size it is. It also tells you what hook it ‘recommends’ to use, but most crocheting projects use this type of yarn.
    • Image result for yarn size
    • Image result for yarn size on the yarn label
  • Markers
    • Markers aren’t really needed, but are very helpful for marking when your stitches begin and end.
    • You don’t necessary need the actually crocheting stitch markers, you can use a paper clip, bobby pin, or anything that is small enough for you to use for crocheting. You can check out the picture and see what I mean.
    • Image result for crochet markers
  • Sewing Needle
    • You will always need a sewing needle for every project you do. When a project is finished, you use them to sew in the ‘unwanted’ strands from the beginning, middle and end of your project.
    • Doesn’t matter what size you use for a yarn needle, a basic size works for most projects and you can also find a pack of needles that has different sizes on Amazon or your local craft store.
  • Scissors
    • You will also always need scissors, for all your projects, to cut off any loose ends. I suggest getting embroidery scissors because they are small and easy to travel with.
    • Image result for embroidery scissors
    • Normal pair of scissors works fine as well.

Now that you have an idea of what you are going to need, let’s talk about some stitch and abbreviation terms, before starting to crochet. I have created a mini ‘cheat sheet’, for you beginners, which will also be posted on all of my social medias. If you were to look at the entire list of crochet abbreviations, your head might spin, so that is why I’m breaking it down for the new comers. Crochet Beginner Cheat Sheet.jpg

The reason why we use ‘abbreviations’ for crocheting, is that some of the terms, that are used, are very long and it would make the pattern, we are reading, very difficult to understand. Most crochet books have a page or two, on what the abbreviations mean and how to do that particular type of stitch.

There are other terms that aren’t listed in crochet books. If you join a crochet group on Facebook, some of them, in the group, will use different terms that aren’t really in the crochet books, or the ones that I have.

Here are a list of ‘slang’ crochet terms, that some people might use, that aren’t necessary in the crochet books:

  • Ami – Short for Amingurumi.
    • Amingurumi are the stuffed animals that you can crochet and make, they just aren’t called ‘stuffed animals’.
  • BiStitchtual – Someone who crochets and knits.
    • I’ve never heard this term before, I don’t think anyone has really used this term, but then again, I haven’t come across someone saying it or calling themselves it.
  • C2C – Corner to Corner.
    • C2C are blankets that you make, using a grid or graph.
  • CAL – Crochet Along,
  • De-stash – Selling or giving away yarn you stash.
    • Most people who do this are ones that might have a lot of yarn just sitting around. Since some brands of yarn are very pricey, you might get them cheaper from someone else who isn’t using them.
  • FO – Finished object.
  • FOTH – Fresh off the hook.
  • Freehand – Making a project without following a pattern.
    • Lots of experience people make these, while writing the pattern as they go. When you become more advance, this is something a lot of people do to make money from crocheting, by selling their patterns.
  • Frogging – Ripping out rows or rounds of crochet (Ribbit, Ribbit)
    • I have done this so many times. Especially if I find I missed a stitch or it doesn’t look ‘neat’ and ‘pretty’. You’ll be doing it too!
  • HOTH – Hot off the hook.
  • Hooker – A proud and happy crocheter.
  • HSPY – Haven’t started project yet.
  • ISO – In search of.
    • If you are in search of a pattern, particular yarn brand, stitch, or any supplies that have to do with crocheting, most groups on Facebook, can be helpful to help you find what you are looking for.
  • JOTH – Just off the hook.
  • LYS – Local or little yarn store.
  • MAM – Mile a minute afghan.
  • MGBTC – Must get back to crocheting.
  • OCD – Obsessive crocheting disorder.
    • Once you get the hang of it, you’ll want to keep going and try different patterns and projects.
  • PABLE – Pattern accumulation beyond life expectancy.
  • PHD – Projects half done.
  • PIGS – Projects in grocery sacks.
  • PTP – Permission to post.
    • Some use these word for posting on social media or sharing it on their personal social media, or blogging sites.
    • This is VERY important to know because if you buy a pattern, most creators do NOT want you to post it on another website or share it with anyone, unless they bought it.
  • SABLE – Stash accumulation beyond life expectancy.
  • STASH – Special treasures all secretly hidden meant to be discovered unexpectedly.
  • TALC – Take along crochet.
  • TIA – Thank you in advance.
  • TOAD – Trashed object abandoned in disgust.
  • UFO – Unfinished object.
  • USO – Unstarted object.
  • Yarn Cakes – The small skeins of yarn that result from using a yarn winder.
  • WIM – Work in mind.
  • WIP – Work in progress.
    • A lot of crocheters will use this term.
  • WIVSP – Work in very slow progress.
  • YAP – Yet another project.
  • Yarn Barf – The tangled mess of yarn from the center of a skein.
    • This happens to me, because I usually use the center string for when I crochet. I love using it because I know have to unravel yarn, but it can be a pain in the ass to unravel, when you use the middle string.
  • Yarn Bomb – A decorative piece of crocheted or knitted art that is strung up in a public place.
  • YART – Yarn acquisition road trip.

Make sure to follow my blog for more beginner posts on crocheting! I will be breaking down everything in little parts and I will also have videos for you to view, if you find it easier to understand and learn!

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