Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: Crochet Hooks, What Should I Get? (For Beginners)

Hey Dearies! Since I am working on a few projects, I figured I would talk to you about the many crochet hooks that you can come to choose from. Especially if you are a beginner, knowing what hooks to get can is very important!

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As a beginner myself, I jumped right into buying a set of crochet hooks from Wish and went from there. However, since I got lucky and only paid 3 bucks for a mini set, I wish I would’ve known there was more than just one type of hooks.

Each type of hooks can have a different feel or how they are in general, but before we get into how they feel, let’s talk about the different kinds of hooks you can get:

  • Aluminum Hooks
  • Plastic Hooks
  • Steel Hooks
  • Wooden/Bamboo Hooks
  • Japanese Hooks

I’m going to break each of these down just so you can get a picture of how they are like and if they are for you. The only ones that I don’t have in my possession, are the Japanese Hooks, but I will still explain and have a photo of them just so you know what they look like.

Also, I am going to put a chart of the different sizes of hooks you can get and how they are labeled, as well.

Image result for crochet hooks size chart

As you can see, there are 3 different types of labels for these hooks. USA, English, and Metric. The easiest one to go by is Metric, I found that it was easier to find hook sizes by using their actually metric size.

To me, using letters to determine which size hook, has been confusing and usually if a pattern says a hook size as a letter, I always end up looking up in my crochet books or search in Google, to get the metric size. Hence why my patterns, don’t have the hooks in letter sizes.

If you are a beginner, Metric is the way to go, but you can determine which one you feel most comfortable following. If you are wondering how small these hooks can be, they can get pretty small or really huge.

Now, let’s get down to talking about the actual hooks themselves.


Aluminum Hooks 

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There are one of the most common hooks you can get. I prefer them/use them, for almost every project! These hooks were one of the first ones that I bought to get into crocheting. They can come in all different colors and can go as little as 0.60!

However, for the little hook sizes, you have to be VERY careful. I actually have a few of the tiny ones and let me tell you, they can bend very easily. I haven’t even used them once, but they bent trying to get them out of the packaging!

Lucky, I haven’t reached a project where I’m required to use them, yet.

Another thing to look out for is that they can’t get wet! When I mean by that is if you have sweaty palms or hands, they can tend to be more difficult to work. First time I used them, I was so excited and nervous that it made it difficult to want to work with them.

Although, you can get grips or even use tape to place around the handle of the hook, making it easier to grip and easier to handle your work better!

Overall, they are perfect for beginners! Plus, I love the different colors you can get them in. My family usually get me crocheting books, and some of them come with these hooks, so I have already started a collection with my metal hooks!


Plastic Hooks

Image result for crochet plastic hook

These next hooks are another fun-coloring type of crochet hook. Now, I want to let you all know that I haven’t had the pleasure to work with a plastic hook in a ‘normal’ size, meaning the only sizes I have are an 8.0-11.5.

Have I worked with them? Yes, I actually used one of them to make a basket for my mini balls of yarn. I do plan on getting myself a plastic set, just so I can have them for an option, which a lot of crocheters tend to so that.

These hooks work pretty well, I don’t have any complains, although I have seen and heard from a few people, that they are very easy to break, which I figured they would because they are made up of plastic.

However, I haven’t had one break on me, ‘knock on wood’, but I can see the smaller ones breaking a lot quicker than the bigger ones.

Overall, I see more people use the bigger plastic hooks more than I do the smaller ones.


Steel Hooks

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I know you are probably thinking, ‘What’s the difference between these and the aluminum ones?’. Well, there are a few differences, but let me explain why.

These hooks have a built-in handle, which is perfect for if you have sweaty hands, as I do from time to time. Not only that, having a handle makes it easier for you to grip the hook better, but it makes it easier to control smaller hooks.

Yes, they do make them in smaller hooks. I actually bought myself a set, that also came with a storage bag, because I was looking for something to help me better grip my smaller hooks, especially, since I crochet a lot of towel toppers.

Although, these are one of my ‘go to’s’, the only problem I have with them is the grips. Now, the set that I bought, had rubber grips, but they were starting to slide off and it made it bothers me when they do that. Especially, when you are crocheting.

If you do want to get yourself a set of these hooks, go for the ones that are built onto the hook itself. If you do end up getting a rubber set, take some hot glue or craft glue, and glue the inside of the rubber piece, and slide your hook back on.

Overall, they do have some very cute grip holders and they can come in multiple colors. These are definitely a must, especially, if you are a beginner!


Wooden/Bamboo Hooks

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These hooks were the first thing that I really wanted, as soon as I got into crocheting! They were handmade and hand-carved, but I really just wanted them as an option and to grow my hook collection.

They are so smooth to the touch and have a point at the top of the hook, which makes going into stitches easier. The size of every hook is hand carved into the hook itself. These were so pretty I didn’t want to use them, but I did have some problems.

The ones I have, they felt weird to use, but when it comes to trying out different hooks, it can take a while to adjust, but it felt weird to use them. It’s not that I didn’t like them, I just the hook itself is very awkward.

I even put on a handle, which I didn’t want to do, but with the handle, it was a little easier.

The smallest size they go, in carving them with would, is a 3.0. Anything smaller is just a metal hook with a wooden grip, which I would like to note, the wooden grip is very strong and I haven’t had any problems with it.

Overall, I like to have a set, just to have it, but I have used them before. It does take some type to get used to, but you also need to be careful because since these are made up of wood/bamboo, they are very easy to break. Hence why they don’t go smaller with size!


Japanese Hooks

Image result for japanese crochet hooks

Now, as I said in the beginning, I’ve never tried these, so I can’t really give a good detailed explanation whether they are good or bad. I do see quite of bit of other crocheters that do use them.

What I have read, from my crocheting books, these hooks are perfect for people who have small hands and it helps with arthritis. From the looks of these hooks, they do look very comfortable.

Overall, you have to try them to get the feel from them. I do plan on getting a set in the near future.


In order to find out what hook works for you, try them all out! Of course, you don’t have to buy the entire set of them, you can always get just one of each and see how they are for you!

I like to have options, especially when crocheting. Have a set of each different hook can give me more options to choose from, no matter what size hook I need!

Leave a comment down below letting me know what kind of hook you prefer to use! I’d love to know!

Don’t forget to follow my Facebook page, I update my temperature blanket daily on there, go live crocheting, and even have free giveaways! Link is down below!

 

https://www.facebook.com/katiesblog96971617/

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Posted in Arts and Crafts

Basic Stitches & Terms Should Know For Crocheting

I was a beginner to crocheting, in the beginning of the year, but I got hooked into it the moment I first learned how to crochet. I thought it was going to be very difficult to pick up, unlike knitting, which my grandmother taught me to do.

If you are interested in learning how to crochet, please keep reading! There were a lot to learn and a lot of different terms. I do consider myself still a ‘beginner’, but I do know most of the stitches and terms, which I have learned over time.

First thing is first, if you are a true beginner, I suggest getting a set of crochet hooks. The first set I ever bought was on Wish, but if you don’t want to wait weeks on end for stuff, you can find a set on Amazon for about $10-$15. Some sets will even come with markers, tape measures, plastic needles, scissors, and some other stuff as well!

Image result for crochet hooks

If you don’t have the extra money to buy a set, you can always go to your local craft store or Walmart, and get the following:

  • Crochet Hook
    • Start with a 5.0mm hook. Most projects require this size and it is also the size I am going to use to show you each stitch.
  • Yarn Size 4 (Medium)
    • If you are unsure what size the yarn is, you can always check on the back of the yarn label, and it will tell you what size it is. It also tells you what hook it ‘recommends’ to use, but most crocheting projects use this type of yarn.
    • Image result for yarn size
    • Image result for yarn size on the yarn label
  • Markers
    • Markers aren’t really needed, but are very helpful for marking when your stitches begin and end.
    • You don’t necessary need the actually crocheting stitch markers, you can use a paper clip, bobby pin, or anything that is small enough for you to use for crocheting. You can check out the picture and see what I mean.
    • Image result for crochet markers
  • Sewing Needle
    • You will always need a sewing needle for every project you do. When a project is finished, you use them to sew in the ‘unwanted’ strands from the beginning, middle and end of your project.
    • Doesn’t matter what size you use for a yarn needle, a basic size works for most projects and you can also find a pack of needles that has different sizes on Amazon or your local craft store.
  • Scissors
    • You will also always need scissors, for all your projects, to cut off any loose ends. I suggest getting embroidery scissors because they are small and easy to travel with.
    • Image result for embroidery scissors
    • Normal pair of scissors works fine as well.

Now that you have an idea of what you are going to need, let’s talk about some stitch and abbreviation terms, before starting to crochet. I have created a mini ‘cheat sheet’, for you beginners, which will also be posted on all of my social medias. If you were to look at the entire list of crochet abbreviations, your head might spin, so that is why I’m breaking it down for the new comers. Crochet Beginner Cheat Sheet.jpg

The reason why we use ‘abbreviations’ for crocheting, is that some of the terms, that are used, are very long and it would make the pattern, we are reading, very difficult to understand. Most crochet books have a page or two, on what the abbreviations mean and how to do that particular type of stitch.

There are other terms that aren’t listed in crochet books. If you join a crochet group on Facebook, some of them, in the group, will use different terms that aren’t really in the crochet books, or the ones that I have.

Here are a list of ‘slang’ crochet terms, that some people might use, that aren’t necessary in the crochet books:

  • Ami – Short for Amingurumi.
    • Amingurumi are the stuffed animals that you can crochet and make, they just aren’t called ‘stuffed animals’.
  • BiStitchtual – Someone who crochets and knits.
    • I’ve never heard this term before, I don’t think anyone has really used this term, but then again, I haven’t come across someone saying it or calling themselves it.
  • C2C – Corner to Corner.
    • C2C are blankets that you make, using a grid or graph.
  • CAL – Crochet Along,
  • De-stash – Selling or giving away yarn you stash.
    • Most people who do this are ones that might have a lot of yarn just sitting around. Since some brands of yarn are very pricey, you might get them cheaper from someone else who isn’t using them.
  • FO – Finished object.
  • FOTH – Fresh off the hook.
  • Freehand – Making a project without following a pattern.
    • Lots of experience people make these, while writing the pattern as they go. When you become more advance, this is something a lot of people do to make money from crocheting, by selling their patterns.
  • Frogging – Ripping out rows or rounds of crochet (Ribbit, Ribbit)
    • I have done this so many times. Especially if I find I missed a stitch or it doesn’t look ‘neat’ and ‘pretty’. You’ll be doing it too!
  • HOTH – Hot off the hook.
  • Hooker – A proud and happy crocheter.
  • HSPY – Haven’t started project yet.
  • ISO – In search of.
    • If you are in search of a pattern, particular yarn brand, stitch, or any supplies that have to do with crocheting, most groups on Facebook, can be helpful to help you find what you are looking for.
  • JOTH – Just off the hook.
  • LYS – Local or little yarn store.
  • MAM – Mile a minute afghan.
  • MGBTC – Must get back to crocheting.
  • OCD – Obsessive crocheting disorder.
    • Once you get the hang of it, you’ll want to keep going and try different patterns and projects.
  • PABLE – Pattern accumulation beyond life expectancy.
  • PHD – Projects half done.
  • PIGS – Projects in grocery sacks.
  • PTP – Permission to post.
    • Some use these word for posting on social media or sharing it on their personal social media, or blogging sites.
    • This is VERY important to know because if you buy a pattern, most creators do NOT want you to post it on another website or share it with anyone, unless they bought it.
  • SABLE – Stash accumulation beyond life expectancy.
  • STASH – Special treasures all secretly hidden meant to be discovered unexpectedly.
  • TALC – Take along crochet.
  • TIA – Thank you in advance.
  • TOAD – Trashed object abandoned in disgust.
  • UFO – Unfinished object.
  • USO – Unstarted object.
  • Yarn Cakes – The small skeins of yarn that result from using a yarn winder.
  • WIM – Work in mind.
  • WIP – Work in progress.
    • A lot of crocheters will use this term.
  • WIVSP – Work in very slow progress.
  • YAP – Yet another project.
  • Yarn Barf – The tangled mess of yarn from the center of a skein.
    • This happens to me, because I usually use the center string for when I crochet. I love using it because I know have to unravel yarn, but it can be a pain in the ass to unravel, when you use the middle string.
  • Yarn Bomb – A decorative piece of crocheted or knitted art that is strung up in a public place.
  • YART – Yarn acquisition road trip.

Make sure to follow my blog for more beginner posts on crocheting! I will be breaking down everything in little parts and I will also have videos for you to view, if you find it easier to understand and learn!

I also go live on my Facebook page on Tuesdays! Check it out and don’t forget to like it, so you can stay in the loop for whenever I post a blog post or go live!
https://www.facebook.com/katiesblog96971617/

 

 

Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: Crochet Ghost Coaster (Easy)

Image result for crochet ghost coasters

Hey Dearies! So, I just wanted to let you know that I did not do a live for this project on my Facebook page, so I am just going to give you guys the pattern, but of course, broken down to a easier way.

Before I begin, I do not own this pattern, it is actually by Red Heart and here is the link:
http://www.redheart.com/files/patterns/pdf/LW4461.pdf

Now, let’s talk about what you will need for this project:

  • Medium Yarn
    • Because this pattern is by Red Heart, they suggest to use Red Heart Brand, which I did in the white and for the eyes, black.
  • Crochet hook 5mm
  • Yarn needle
    • You will need this for making the eyes.
  • Row Counter
    • You don’t need this, but it is very helpful when it comes to counting rows. It makes it easier to not get lost in the pattern.

Let’s Begin! Let’s start by making a slip knot on our hook and chaining 2.

Row 1: Single crochet into the 2nd chain from the hook. Turn your work.

Row 2: Chain 1. Make 2 single crochets into the next stitch. Turn your work.

Row 3: Chain 1. Single crochet in the first stitch. Then make 2 single crochets in the next stitch. Turn your work.

Row 4: Chain 1. Make 2 single crochets in the first stitch. Single crochet in each of the last 2 stitches. Turn your work.

Row 5: Chain 1. Single crochet in each of the first 3 stitches. Make 2 single crochets in the last stitch. Turn your work.

Row 6: Chain 1. Make 2 single crochets in the first stitch. Single crochet in each of the last 4 stitches. Turn your work.

Row 7-9: Chain 1. Single crochet in each stitch across. Turn your work.

Row 10: Chain 1. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the first 2 stitches. Single crochet in each of the next 2 stitches. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the next 2 stitches. Turn your work.

Row 11: Chain 1. Single crochet in each stitch across. Chain 10. Turn your work.

Row 12: Double crochet in the 4th chain from the hook. Double crochet in the next 2 chains. Half double crochet in the next 3 stitches. Single crochet in the last chain. Single crochet in the next 4 stitches. Chain 10. Turn your work.

Row 13: Double crochet in the 4th chain from the hook. Double crochet in each of the next 2 chains. Half double crochet in each of the next 3 chains. Single crochet in the last chain. Single crochet in the next 7 stitches. Half double crochet in the next stitch. Double crochet in the next stitch. Double crochet 2 together (dc2tog) over the next 2 stitches. Turn your work, leaving turning chain unworked.

Row 14: Chain 1. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the first 2 stitches. Single crochet in each of the next 11 stitches. Half double crochet in the next stitch. Double crochet in the next stitch. Double crochet 2 together (dc2tog) over the next 2 stitches. Turn your work, leaving turning chain unworked.

Row 15: Chain 1. Single crochet together (sc2tog) over the first 2 stitches. Single crochet in each of the next 11 stitches. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the last 2 stitches. Turn your work.

Row 16: Chain 1. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the first 2 stitches. Single crochet in each of the next 9 stitches.  Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the last 2 stitches. Turn your work.

Row 17-25: Chain 1. Single crochet in each stitch across. Turn your work.

Row 26: Chain 1. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the first 2 stitches. Single crochet in each stitch across. Turn your work.

Row 27: Chain 1. Single crochet in each of the next 8 stitches. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the last 2 stitches. Turn your work.

Row 28: Chain 1. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the first 2 stitches. Single crochet in each of the next 6 stitches. make 2 single crochets in the last stitch. Turn your work.

Row 29: Chain 1. Make 2 single crochets in the first stitch. Single crochet in each of the next 6 stitches. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the last 2 stitches.

Row 30: Chain 1. Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog). 1 Single crochet in the next 6 stitches. Make 2 single crochets in the last stitch. Turn your work.

Row 31: Chain 1. Make 2 single crochets in the first stitch. Single crochet in each of the next 4 stitches. [Single crochet 2 together (sc2tog) over the next 2 stitches] twice. Do not fasten off yet!

Edging: Chain 1 and single crochet all around the ghost. Work 3 single crochet in the same stitch for the very top of the ghost and the bottom points. Once you reach to where you started, fasten off.

*Note: You can stick with the plain white, for the edging, or do a different color, such as black or orange. For this pattern, they used just white.

Making the eyes and mouth: With a yarn needle, and the black yarn or the color of your choice. For the eyes, embroider 2 French knots (If you don’t know how to do them, the video that shows you how to make these will show you how to make the French knots.) For the mouth, embroider satin stitches over 2 rows for an oval-shaped mouth.

Then you are done!

If you are like me and need to visually see what you are doing from start to finish, click the link down below:

Normally, I go live with the pattern the same day I post them, but because I do not want to behind on the many patterns and projects I have in mind, I won’t be doing one.

If you are interested in voting on a project or pattern or want to know when I go live with the projects, just check out my Facebook Page.
https://www.facebook.com/katiesblog96971617/

 

Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: How To Crochet A Flower Pin (Beginners)

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Hey dearies! You are probably wondering why you are getting a Crafty Sassy on a Friday, so let me tell you why! Since this coming up week will be the beginning of October, I have decided to go live twice, for the month of October!

So, I wanted to show you guys how to make this flower pin, because it also goes with the headband I showed you guys how to make on Tuesday. So, I will be going live on my Facebook Page. More information on that will be at the bottom of this!

Let’s get started! First thing, let’s talk about what you will need for this project:

  • Medium Yarn
    • Any color of your choice. Since this flower goes with the headband, you can match a color to go with it or whatever color you feel works best!
  • Crochet Hook 4.5 mm
  • Sewing needle
  • 1 Pin back
    • It doesn’t required any fancy pin, a safety pin would work find as well!

Part 1: Making the flower

  • Step 1: Chain 53
  • Step 2: Double crochet in the 3rd chain from the hook. Double crochet in every following chain across.
  • Step 3: Chain 1 and turn your work. *Single crochet in the next space. Make 5 double crochets in the next space* (The stars are to let you know that you have to repeat, until you reach the end or if they say otherwise)
  •  Step 4: Fasten off and make sure you leave a long tail because we will be using it to sew the flower altogether.

Part 2: Sewing the flower together

  • Step 1: Loosely arrange the layers to form a flower.
  • Step 2: Using a threaded yarn/sewing needle, stitch each layer of the flower together, ending on the back side.
  • Step 3: Draw the threaded needle through the pin back. Secure the pin back onto the back of your flower and cut the excess yarn to complete the flower pin. And your done!

 

Having a pin, on the back of your flower, can make it so you can wear it on hats, scarfs, headbands, necklace, etc. So there’s not just one use for this project.

Anyway, I will be going live tonight on my Facebook Page. If you haven’t like my Facebook Page, here is the link!
https://www.facebook.com/katiesblog96971617/

Let’s talk about the NEW plans for the month of October!

I plan on bring Crafty Sassy to you on Tuesday’s and Thursday, just for this month! Instead of the normal stuff that is for beginners and such, I’ve decided to make this month a ‘holiday special’. I will be doing the same for November and December.

If you have any projects that you want me to show you how to make, leave a comment down below, message my Facebook page, or even e-mail me at katie_farrington@aol.com!

 

 

Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: How To Make A Latch Hook Pillow/Pillow Case (My Version)

Image result for latch hook pillow

Good Morning all of my dearies! So, I figured I would show you how I make my latch hook pillows. I have already done a tutorial on the latch hook, and how simple and easy it is to do.

Now, I did this all on my own, I didn’t find this online, I came up with the idea because of the fact that some of the latch hooks were too amazing to just have as a rug. So, I figured that I would make a latch hook and turn it into a pillow. Not all of my latch hook pillows are perfect, I haven’t really mastered it, but I try to be better than the last time.

These are great gifts for family or friends, I would say for everyone, but it depending on the size of the latch hook and making the backing, it can be a very long process. The quickest that I was able to do, was about 2 months, but that was a small foot by foot latch hook. If you have kids, expect the project to take longer.

So, first things first, you need to have the following supplies:

  • Latch Hook kit
    • If you are a beginner, I recommend with starting out with a small latch hook, a foot by foot one would be perfect to start on and it won’t take as long as a bigger one.
  • Yarn (Medium)
    • The backing I just basically knitting small squares together or two long parts that I end up sewing together. The color can be any color you want it to be, as long as it is medium thickness and somewhat matches your latch hook.
    • I would try and get two yarn rolls, just to start out, but do keep in mind that you will also need it to sew the pillow together.
    • *Note* Try and avoid black yarn, especially if you are a beginner, black yarn is very hard to work with. Dark colors might be okay, but try and avoid them, if you are just starting out.
  • Metal Thick Needle
    • You’ll need this to sew your pillow together, or pillow case. I recommend using a thicker needle (Not talking about knitting needles!), the reason is because it will make it easier to sew them together. Plus, with the thinner needles, you can tend to break them, believe me, I have broken a few.
  • Scissors
  • Knitting Needles
    • Make sure that you have the knitting needles suggested size, it is on the yarn roll and suggests a size.
  • Rug Binding
    • This you will used around the sides for the latch hook, making sure that it doesn’t fall apart when finished.
  • Fabric Glue
    • I found that it was easier to use fabric glue to keep the rug binding together. You can use an iron, but I have tried and It didn’t work, I’m not sure if I did it right or not.
  • Stuffing (for making a pillow)
    • You can stuff it and then close it, or if you or anyone you are giving the latch hook pillow has any pets, I would take a pillow case and fill it and then put it into the pillow. It’s totally up to you.

Once you have everything, that I have suggested to have, you can finally start! First, before we can begin our pillow, we need to complete the latch hook, first. This might be the longest part that you need to do to make this pillow.

Then, knit the backing, you can either knit a classic square, or make it longer and have different pieces that you end up sewing together. Whatever is easier for you to do, I found that the squares were easier, depending how big your latch hook is, it made it easier to see the progress versus just knitting a long part.

The reason why we should make the latch hook first, is because once we trim it down, it will be easier to measure or know how long or wide you need to go. Some latch hooks don’t have a printed picture on them, some of them are blank and give you a big blank latch hook, just to make sure that you have enough to make the latch hook.

That’s only with the bigger latch hooks, a since foot by foot is usually has a printed design on it, so that you can follow the pattern.

After both parts are completely, just sew them onto the latch hook, making sure that you cover the latch hook grid. If you are making a pillow case, only sew around it, leave the top untouched, so that you are able to place a pillow into the opening.

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It should, almost look like the picture above, this was a project that I made for my aunt for her birthday. Her favorite Disney princess is Belle, so I made her a small foot by foot pillow.

This latch hook, I got from Hobby Lobby, but I am pretty sure you can find it on Amazon, you might be lucky and find it at Walmart, but I wouldn’t get your hopes up. This latch hook did not have a grid, with the picture, so that you can follow it on key.

The picture was printed on the latch hook and I made the best judgement for each one. The background isn’t green, it’s purple, I changed it to my aunt’s favorite color, instead. Another note, for this latch hook, the yarn is SUPER thick and was a pain in the ass to hook on.

However, the yarn I used for the background was a simple medium yarn, what most latch hooks use, so I was glad that the background wasn’t as difficult to do.

Next Tuesday, I have a surprise! I am going to show you how to make a book mark! Not just any kind of book mark, a crochet-made bookmark!

Posted in Arts and Crafts

Crafty Sassy: How To Loom Knit A Scarf (Figure 8 Stitch)

Happy Tuesday to all my crafters! Today, I’m going to take you step-by-step on how to loom knit a basic scarf. I’m going to break it down, just in case some others go way too fast.

20180703_145052.jpg

 

 

Now, I am going to be using a solid blue color yarn, I figured using a plan color would be easier to focus on. I’m also using a medium size yarn, which is a basic yarn that you would get from the craft store.

If you don’t have a looming set or kit, you can buy them on Amazon, Walmart, or your local craft store. The one I have is the KB Tadpole Loom, I got this from either Walmart or Kmart. It comes with the loom set and a little booklet, that shows you how to 8 different thinks with the loom.

So, first thing is first, we need to create a slip knot. Now, if you don’t know what a slip knot is, that’s okay because I am going to explain it too you. A slip knot is a basic knot that is used for knitting, crocheting, looming, etc, projects. I basically holds the start of your work together.

A lot of people do a slip knot differently, you don’t have to do it my way, but I would look on how other’s make a slip knot and choose whatever makes you comfortable. Here is a quick visual on how I make a slip knot:

  1. Find the start of your yarn and hold on to it. I have used this yarn before, as you can see. If you are using a brand new yarn, you can either find the start of it by grabbing the middle string, that might be sticking out, or look around the yarn and see if you can find the other end. Personally, I rather grab from the outside, because mostly every time that I grab onto the middle and pull, sometimes it be in a knot.
    1. 20180703_145501.jpg
  2. Wrap the yarn around your finger, leaving a enough space in between them. See photo below:
    1. 20180703_145513-1.jpg
  3. Next, you are going to pull the first yarn over the second yarn, like this, see below:
    1. 20180703_145557.jpg
  4. Then, you are going to pull the end of the yarn, so that it’s tight, not too tight on your finger, though.
    1. 20180703_145616.jpg
      • And there you have your slip knot!

Now that we have a slip knot, we can begin! So, take the slip knot off of your finger and place it on one of the end pegs, and tighten it, not too tight, though. Like shown below:

20180703_145650.jpg

What we need to do next is wrap the yarn around the pegs. Pay very close attention to how we do the figure 8 stitch.

It will look tricky at first, but it’s very simple, just make sure that you are wrapping each and every peg, as shown in the picture above. Once you get to the other side, see below, go back and re-wrap all the pegs, using the same stitch that you just did.

When you finish wrapping all the pegs again, your work should look like this, if I explained it well enough. This is the top view:

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Here is what the side view will look like:

20180703_150113.jpg

If you haven’t already noticed, that there was one peg that was only wrapped once. That is okay! It is supposed to be like that. Every time that you wrap them a second time, there will always be one that isn’t wrapped twice.

Now, because this loom doesn’t have a end peg that you can wrap around, I wrapped the yarn around the side of my loom, because if you don’t, your work will come undone. That is the only down fall with this loom, it doesn’t have a place to wrap your yarn.

Anyway, here comes the more difficult part. You will need your hook for this step. Take your hook and grab, from the first set of yarn that we cased on, you are going to pull it over the peg and over the second yarn. Note: It doesn’t matter which side you start on, but which every one you decide to start on, finish it before moving on to the other side. 

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You keep doing this, on the side you are working on, it should look like this, when you finish your first side.

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It’s okay if they are a little loose, most of them will end up in the middle anyway, so it’s okay that they don’t, at first.

Once you have completed the other side, your work should look like this:

20180703_150500.jpg

Then, just gently push the middle of your work down and recast another figure 8 stitch, until you get it to the length you desire. I have added a chart, for the average lengths, but if you want a scarf that fits perfect, for you or whoever you are making it for. Hold you arms out side and have someone measure from fingertip to fingertip, that will give you the exact length you need.

Image result for scarf sizes

How To End Your Work

I don’t have any pictures on how to cast off, so I am going to explain the best I can. I will be making a YouTube video about this blog post and will attach, once it is uploaded. I will make sure to have pictures, as well.

Basically, you’ll be transforming one side to the other and then binding off. So, grab your hook and take one of your yarn, from your first peg, and wrap it around the peg across from that peg. Note: I’m pretty sure you can start from either side, when you bind off. But don’t quote me on it. 

 Once you have finished that, and got to the final hook, your work should just come off and you should be all set.

There you have it! I’m sorry if I didn’t explain it a little better. I will be making a video on how to do it, as soon as possible and I will edit at this post, once I do! If you have any ideas or want me to try out something new, let me know in a comment or send me an e-mail at katie_farrington@aol.com!